Media

 
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July 31, 2013   Article by Joel B. Greenhouse published in The Huffington Post
   

An article by Joel B. Greenhouse, Ph.D., was recently published in The Huffington Post. Statistical Thinking: The Bedrock of Data Science gives a brief overview of the scope of statistical sciences and discusses the current excitement about statistics and data analysis as they relate to Big Data (our relatively recent ability to generate, manage and use massive amounts of data). The article stresses the importance of good statistical thinking in analyzing and making sense of such data.

 
 
November 5, 2012   Study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry
November 2012 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry  

A study led by Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., was published in the November 2012 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry regarding the development of a computerized adaptive test (CAT) for depression: the CAT-Depression Inventory or "CAT-DI."
* Please note that Figure 3 in the article referenced above should be replaced with this image.

The paper describes how CAT based on multidimensional item response theory can adaptively select a small targeted set of items for each individual from a much larger bank of test items. The paradigm shift is from a fixed set of items with varying measurement uncertainty to a varying number of items with fixed measurement uncertainty. The net result is a dramatic improvement over traditional mental health measurement. The CAT-DI requires an average of 12 items per patient yet maintains a correlation of r=0.95 with the entire 400 item bank. Using an empirically derived threshold, sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.88 are obtained for differentiating patients with major depressive disorder (based on systematic DSM-IV interview) versus non-psychiatric controls.

The production version of the CAT-DI and related tests for anxiety and bipolar disorder (CAT-Mental Health or CAT-MH suite of instruments) are currently under development and should be available by the end of 2012. More information about web- and Windows-based versions of the CAT-MH programs is available at Adaptive Testing Technologies.

 
 
February 6, 2012   Robert D. Gibbons interviewed by U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report  

Robert D. Gibbons was interviewed by U.S. News & World Report about a recent study by Gibbons et al., published Online First by the Archives of General Psychiatry on February 6, 2012.

The study found that antidepressant drugs such as fluoxetine and venlafaxine decreased suicidal thoughts and behavior for adult and geriatric patients. For youths, no significant effects of treatment on suicidal thoughts and behavior were found, although depression responded to treatment. No evidence of increased suicide risk was observed in youths receiving active medication.

These findings are presented in the article “Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior With Antidepressant Treatment: Reanalysis of the Randomized Placebo-Controlled Studies of Fluoxetine and Venlafaxine” by Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., Kwan Hur, Ph.D., John M. Davis, M.D., and J. John Mann, M.D.

 
 
May 2, 2011   Study reviews strategies for quantifying the relationship between medications and suicidal behaviour
May 2011 issue of Drug Safety  

In the May 2011 issue of Drug Safety, Robert D. Gibbons and J. John Mann review the most recent literature on the relationship between drugs (antidepressants, antiepileptics, varenicline, montelukast and antipsychotics) and suicidal events.

The study, described in Strategies for Quantifying the Relationship between Medications and Suicidal Behaviour: What has been Learned?  View PDF, examines the literature on methodological and statistical approaches to the design and analysis of suicidal event studies.

The authors conclude that overall, there appears to be little evidence that drugs increase the risk of suicide and related behaviour. Suicidal thoughts are quite common, particularly among patients with depression, and may have little relationship to suicidal behaviour and/or completion.

 
 
March 30, 2010   Study examines a variety of approaches for determining the possibility of adverse drug reactions following the drug-approval process
   

In the March 2010 volume of the Annual Review of Public Health, Robert D. Gibbons and colleagues review a variety of approaches to drug safety surveillance, including spontaneous reports, meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials, ecological studies, and analysis of medical claims data.

The study, described in Post-Approval Drug Safety Surveillance, provides an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of each method and an overview of some of the existing literature on the relationship between antidepressants and suicidality using many of these methods. The authors also include new analyses that have not previously been performed to illustrate some of the newer methods described.

   
 
December 11, 2009   Study concludes that antiepileptic drugs do not increase risk of suicide attempts in patients with bipolar disorder
December 2009 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry  

In the December 2009 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, Robert D. Gibbons and colleagues examine the link between suicide attempts and 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) identified in a January 2008 Food and Drugs Administration alert regarding increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior related to the use of AEDs.

The pharmacoepidemiologic study described in Relationship Between Antiepileptic Drugs and Suicide Attempts in Patients With Bipolar Disorder View PDF compares suicide attempt rates before and after treatment and with a medication-free control group.

A discussion of the study can be found in the following publications:

Antiepileptic Drugs Not Associated With Increased Risk of Suicide Attempts in Patients With Bipolar Disorder
Journal of the American Medical Association News Release

No Link Between Antiepileptics and Suicidality in Patients With Bipolar Disorder View PDF
by Deborah Brauser, Medscape Medical News

Reconsidering antiepileptic medications as a treatment for bipolar disorder
by Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times

Epilepsy Drugs for Bipolar Disorder: Fewer Suicides?
by Daniel J. DeNoon, WebMD Health News

     
 
September 16, 2009   A second Psychiatric Annals guest editorial by Robert D. Gibbons
July 2009 issue of Psychiatric Annals  

In the July 2009 issue of Psychiatric Annals, guest editor Robert D. Gibbons introduces several articles that provide an overview of the following general statistical topics:

  • the problems of determining association in two-by-two tables as related to assessing risk factors and diagnostic and prognostic tests
  • the analysis of observational data in general and how nonexperimental data can be used to derive inference regarding treatment effects
  • the role of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) in analyzing experimental data
  • the statistical approaches to analysis of multiple outcomes in psychiatric investigations
  • the concepts of “mediators and moderators” and how they are related to clinical decision making

Read the guest editorial and articles

   
 
December 31, 2008   Guest Editorial by Robert D. Gibbons published in Psychiatric Annals
December 2008 issue of Psychiatric Annals  

In the December 2008 issue of Psychiatric Annals, guest editor Robert D. Gibbons provides a review of the important statistical methodologies and issues that have arisen in the analysis of longitudinal data over the past 15 years.

The guest editorial, Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Studies View PDF, introduces several articles that focus on important topics such as sample size determination for clustered and/or longitudinal studies, the role of the intent-to-treat principle in longitudinal studies and various alternatives, missing data in longitudinal clinical trials and balancing treatment and comparison groups in longitudinal studies.

Read this issue's articles

     
 
April 2, 2008   Computerized adaptive testing shown to dramatically reduce administration time and patient and clinician burden
April 2008 issue of Psychiatric Services  

In the lead article of the April 2008 issue of Psychiatric Services, Robert D. Gibbons et al. investigate the combination of item response theory and computerized adaptive testing (CAT) as a means to reduce the time required to administer a collection of extensive, fixed-length psychiatric instruments for mental health measurement and diagnostic purposes.

The methodology described in Using Computerized Adaptive Testing to Reduce the Burden of Mental Health Assessment View PDF streamlines and individualizes the measurement process, increases measurement precision and decreases respondent and clinician burden.

The article is featured in the issue's This Month's Highlights View PDF and is further discussed in the Commentary, Are We Ready for Computerized Adaptive Testing? View PDF

     
 
March 31, 2008   Robert D. Gibbons interviewed on ABC7 News

In a recent appearance on the ABC7 News Special Segment, Too young to die, Dr. Gibbons spoke on the relation between the 2004 introduction by the FDA of the "black box" warning on anti-depressants and the recent decrease in SSRI prescriptions and increase in youth suicide rates.

   
 
September 6, 2007   Robert D. Gibbons et al. study in the news

The latest study by Robert D. Gibbons et al. on the effects of the FDA's "black box" warnings on SSRI prescriptions and youth suicide rates is discussed in several recent articles, some of which are listed below:

Youth Suicides Increased As Antidepressant Use Fell View PDF
by The Washington Post

Suicide Rises in Youth; Antidepressant Debate Looms View PDF
by The New York Times

As youth suicides increase, FDA's label rule criticized View PDF
by Chicago Tribune

     
 
September 1, 2007   Study connects suicidality warnings to a decrease in SSRI prescriptions and an increase in youth suicide rates
September 2007 issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry  

The study examines whether U.S. and European regulatory agencies issued suicidality warnings led to a decrease in SSRI prescriptions for children and adolescents and consequently an increase in suicide rates as a result of untreated depression.

These findings are presented in the “Early Evidence on the Effects of Regulatorsí Suicidality Warnings on SSRI Prescriptions and Suicide in Children and Adolescents” article by Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., Kwan Hur, Ph.D., Sue M. Marcus, Ph.D., Dulal K. Bhaumik, Ph.D., Joëlle A. Erkens, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Ron M.C. Herings, Pharm.D., Ph.D., and J. John Mann, M.D.

The article appears in the September 2007 issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry.

     
 
July 16, 2007   Robert D. Gibbons quoted in Newsweek article

Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., is quoted in a Newsweek article View PDF with respect to the "black box" warning introduced by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004 to alert patients and physicians that antidepressants could lead to an "increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior among children and adolescents."

This article comes at a time when several new studies conclude that it is much more likely that suicidal behavior leads to treatment than that treatment leads to suicidal behavior. In light of the findings of these studies many experts are calling on the FDA to modify and even repeal its warning.

     
 
July 10, 2007   Robert D. Gibbons quoted in New York Times article

Robert D. Gibbons, director of the Center for Health Statistics and professor of biostatistics and psychiatry, is quoted in a New York Times article View PDF about his recent study that found antidepressants lower the risk of suicide attempt in adults with depression —a finding that questions the FDA's recent decision to add a "black box" warning on antidepressant drugs for young adults.

     
 
July 1, 2007

  Study of suicide in depressed veterans published in The American Journal of Psychiatry
July 2007 issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry  

A study of the relationship between antidepressant treatment and suicide attempts in adult patients in the Veterans Administration health care system found that suicide attempt rates were lower among patients who were treated with antidepressants than among those who were not.

These findings are presented in the “Relationship Between Antidepressants and Suicide Attempts: An Analysis of the Veterans Health Administration Data Sets” article by Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., Kwan Hur, Ph.D., Sue M. Marcus, Ph.D., Dulal K. Bhaumik, Ph.D., and J. John Mann, M.D.

The article appears in the July 2007 issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry, the official journal of the American Psychiatric Association.

   
 
November 1, 2006   Study of early adolescent suicide published in The American Journal of Psychiatry
November 2006 issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry  

A county-by-county study of the entire United States found that suicide rates among children ages 5-14 during the period 1996-1998 were lower in counties with higher numbers of antidepressant pills prescribed per person.

These findings are presented in the article "The Relationship Between Antidepressant Prescription Rates and Rate of Early Adolescent Suicide" View PDF by Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., Kwan Hur, Ph.D., Dulal K. Bhaumik, Ph.D., and J. John Mann, M.D., of the Center for Health Statistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

The article is also highlighted in the editorial "How Can We Know Whether Antidepressants Increase Suicide Risk?" View PDF by Dr. Gregory E. Simon, M.D., M.P.H., of the Group Health's Center for Health Studies and in a News Release View PDF by the American Psychiatric Association.

     
 
September 23, 2006   Report on national drug safety discussed in New York Times article

The New York Times article Study Condemns F.D.A.’s Handling of Drug Safety  View PDF discusses the findings and recommendations of the report, and its role in intensifying the debate over the safety of the nation's drug supply and the adequacy of the government's oversight.

     
 
September 22, 2006   Institute of Medicine committee reviews the U.S. Drug Safety System
Read the IOM report  

A 15-member Institute of Medicine committee, which includes Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., has issued a report, The Future of Drug Safety: Promoting and Protecting the Health of the Public, that reviews the drug safety policies of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and offers a broad set of recommendations to ensure that consideration of safety extends from before product approval through the entire time the product is marketed and used.

     
 
August 30, 2006   Robert D. Gibbons et al. article to be published in The American Journal of Psychiatry

"The Relationship Between Antidepressant Prescription Rates and Rate of Early Adolescent Suicide" by Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., Kwan Hur, Ph.D., Dulal K. Bhaumik, Ph.D., and J. John Mann, M.D., will be highlighted in The American Journal of Psychiatry's In This Issue View PDF section and featured in a newsletter.

     
 
May 29, 2006   Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., serves on NIH expert panel on U.S. use of multivitamins

Robert D. Gibbons, Ph.D., was one of the 13 members of the expert panel convened by the National Institutes of Health to assess the effectiveness and safety of multivitamin and mineral supplements in chronic disease prevention.

The panel's findings received wide media coverage all around the world. Read more about the evidence taken into consideration and the panel's conclusions in the "Benefits of Multivitamins Unclear, Panel Finds" article View PDF, featured on page 70 of Clinical Psychiatry News, Volume 34, Issue 7.

 
   
  Last updated July 31, 2013. Copyright © 2003-2013 Center for Health Statistics. All Rights Reserved.
   

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